An Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography

Snippets from Selected Exercises

Jill Pipher, Jeffrey Hoffstein, Joseph H. Silverman

This page includes material from many of the exercises in the book. It is designed to save you time and potential errors, since you can cut-and-paste material, rather than having to retype it. (See the book for the complete statement of each problem.)

CHAPTER 1 — An Introduction to Cryptography

Exercise 1.1
Build a cipher wheel ...

Click to download a Cipher Wheel that you can print and cut out to use for Exercise 1.1.

(a) Encrypt the following plaintext...
A page of history is worth a volume of logic.

(b) Decrypt the following plaintext...
AOLYLHYLUVZLJYLAZILAALYAOHUAOLZLJYLALZAOHALCLYFIVKFNBLZZLZ

(c) Decrypt the following plaintext...
XJHRFTNZHMZGAHIUETXZJNBWNUTRHEPOMDNBJMAUGORFAOIZOCC

Exercise 1.2
Decrypt each of the following Caesar encryptions...

(a) LWKLQNWKDWLVKDOOQHYHUVHHDELOOERDUGORYHOBDVDWUHH

(b) UXENRBWXCUXENFQRLQJUCNABFQNWRCJUCNAJCRXWORWMB

(c) BGUTBMBGZTFHNLXMKTIPBMAVAXXLXTEPTRLEXTOXKHHFYHKMAXFHNLX

Exercise 1.3

(a) Encrypt the plaintext message: The gold is hidden in the garden.

(c) Use your decryption table from (b) to decrypt the following message.
IBXLX JVXIZ SLLDE VAQLL DEVAU QLB

Exercise 1.4
Each of the following messages has been encrypted using a simple substitution cipher. Decrypt them.

(a) A Piratical Treasure
JNRZR BNIGI BJRGZ IZLQR OTDNJ GRIHT USDKR ZZWLG OIBTM NRGJN
IJTZJ LZISJ NRSBL QVRSI ORIQT QDEKJ JNRQW GLOFN IJTZX QLFQL
WBIMJ ITQXT HHTBL KUHQL JZKMM LZRNT OBIMI EURLW BLQZJ GKBJT
QDIQS LWJNR OLGRI EZJGK ZRBGS MJLDG IMNZT OIHRK MOSOT QHIJL
QBRJN IJJNT ZFIZL WIZTO MURZM RBTRZ ZKBNN LFRVR GIZFL KUHIM
MRIGJ LJNRB GKHRT QJRUU RBJLW JNRZI TULGI EZLUK JRUST QZLUK
EURFT JNLKJ JNRXR S

(b) A Botanical Code
KZRNK GJKIP ZBOOB XLCRG BXFAU GJBNG RIXRU XAFGJ BXRME MNKNG
BURIX KJRXR SBUER ISATB UIBNN RTBUM NBIGK EBIGR OCUBR GLUBN
JBGRL SJGLN GJBOR ISLRS BAFFO AZBUN RFAUS AGGBI NGLXM IAZRX
RMNVL GEANG CJRUE KISRM BOOAZ GLOKW FAUKI NGRIC BEBRI NJAWB
OBNNO ATBZJ KOBRC JKIRR NGBUE BRINK XKBAF QBROA LNMRG MALUF
BBG

(c) A Brilliant Detective
GSZES GNUBE SZGUG SNKGX CSUUE QNZOQ EOVJN VXKNG XGAHS AWSZZ
BOVUE SIXCQ NQESX NGEUG AHZQA QHNSP CIPQA OIDLV JXGAK CGJCG
SASUB FVQAV CIAWN VWOVP SNSXV JGPCV NODIX GJQAE VOOXC SXXCG
OGOVA XGNVU BAVKX QZVQD LVJXQ EXCQO VKCQG AMVAX VWXCG OOBOX
VZCSO SPPSN VAXUB DVVAX QJQAJ VSUXC SXXCV OVJCS NSJXV NOJQA
MVBSZ VOOSH VSAWX QHGMV GWVSX CSXXC VBSNV ZVNVN SAWQZ ORVXJ
CVOQE JCGUW NVA

Exercise 1.7
... compute the following quotients and remainders.

(a) 34787 divided by 353.

(b) 238792 divided by 7843.

(c) 9829387493 divided by 873485.

(d) 1498387487 divided by 76348.

Exercise 1.8
... compute the following remainders, without bothering to compute the associated quotients.

(a) The remainder of 78745 divided by 127.

(b) The remainder of 2837647 divided by 4387.

(c) The remainder of 8739287463 divided by 18754.

(d) The remainder of 4536782793 divided by 9784537.

Exercise 1.9
Use the Euclidean algorithm to compute the following greatest common divisors.

(a) gcd(291,252).

(b) gcd(16261,85652).

(c) gcd(139024789,93278890).

(d) gcd(16534528044,8332745927).

Exercise 1.12(c)
Use your program to compute g=gcd(a,b) and integer solutions to the equation au+bv=g for the following pairs (a,b).

(i) (527,1258)

(ii) (228,1056)

(iii) (163961,167181)

(iv) (3892394,239847)

Exercise 1.28
Compute the following ordp values.

(a) Compute ord2(2816).

(b) Compute ord7(2222574487).

(c) Compute ordp(46375) for each of p=3, 5, 7, and 11.

Exercise 1.39
A transposition cipher is a cipher in which the letters of the plaintext remain the same, but their order is rearranged. ...

(a) Use this transposition cipher to encrypt the first 25 letters of the message
Four score and seven years ago our forefathers ...

(b) The following message was encrypted using this transpostion cipher. Decrypt it.
WNOOA HTUFN EHRHE NESUV ICEME

(c) There are many variations on this type of cipher. ... Try to decrypt the following ciphertext ...
WHNCE STRHT TEOOH ALBAT DETET SADHE
LEELL QSFMU EEEAT VNLRI ATUDR HTEEA

Exercise 1.44

(a) Convert the 12 bit binary number 110101100101 into a decimal integer between 0 and 212–1.

(b) Convert the decimal integer m=37853 into a binary number.

(c) Convert the decimal integer m=9487428 into a binary number.

(d) Use exclusive or (XOR) to "add" the bit strings 11001010 ⊕ 10011010.

(e) Convert the decimal numbers 8734 and 5177 into binary numbers, combine them using XOR, and convert the result back into a decimal number.

Exercise 1.46
... Demonstrate your attack by finding the private key used to encrypt the 16 bit ciphertext c=1001010001010111 if you know that the corresponding plaintext is m=0010010000101100.

Exercise 1.48
Eve intercepts the following two ciphertexts:

c1 = 12849217045006222, and c2 = 6485880443666222.

Use the gcd method ... to find Bob and Alice's private key.

CHAPTER 2 — Discrete Logarithms and Diffie–Hellman

Exercise 2.28
Use the Pohlig–Hellman Algorithm to solve the discrete logarithm problem...

(a) p = 433, g = 7, a = 166.

(b) p = 746497, g = 10, a = 243278.

(c) p = 41022299, g = 2, a = 39183497. (Hint: p=2*295+1.)

(d) p = 1291799, g = 17, a = 192988. (Hint: p–1 has a factor of 709.)

Exercises 2.34 and 2.35
Let a and b be the polynomials
a = x5 + 3x4 - 5x3 - 3x2 + 2x + 2,
b = x5 + x4 - 2x3 + 4x2 + x + 5.
Use the Euclidean algorithm...

Here are computer-friendly (cut-and-paste) versions of the same polyomials:
a = x^5 + 3x^4 - 5x^3 - 3x^2 + 2x + 2
b = x^5 + x^4 - 2x^3 + 4x^2 + x + 5

Exercises 2.37
Click here for a PDF version of Table 2.5 that you can print and use to fill in the blanks.

CHAPTER 3 — Integer Factorization and RSA

Exercises 3.5(b)
Solve the following congruences. ...

(i) x577 ≡ 60 (mod 1463).

(ii) x959 ≡ 1583 (mod 1625).

(iii) x133957 ≡ 224689 (mod 2134440).

Exercises 3.8
For each of the given values of N=pq and (p-1)(q-1), use the method described in Remark 3.10 to determine p and q.

(a) N = pq = 352717 and (p – 1)(q – 1) = 351520.

(b) N = pq = 77083921 and (p – 1)(q – 1) = 77066212.

(c) N = pq = 109404161 and (p – 1)(q – 1) = 109380612.

(d) N = pq = 172205490419 and (p – 1)(q – 1) = 172204660344.

Exercises 3.9
A decryption exponent for an RSA public key (N,e) is an integer d with the property that...

(b) Let N = 38749709. Eve's magic box tells her that the encryption exponent e = 10988423 has decryption exponent d = 16784693 and that the encryption exponent e = 25910155 has decryption exponent d = 11514115. Use this information to factor N.

(c) Let N = 225022969. Eve's magic box tells her the following three encryption/decryption pairs for N:
(70583995,4911157), (173111957,7346999), (180311381,29597249).
Use this information to factor N.

(d) Let N = 1291233941. Eve's magic box tells her the following three encryption/decryption pairs for N:
(1103927639,76923209), (1022313977,106791263), (387632407,7764043).
Use this information to factor N.

Exercises 3.12
Alice decides to use RSA with the public key N = 1889570071. In order to guard against transmission errors, Alice has Bob encrypt his message twice, once using the encryption exponent e1 = 1021763679 and once using the encryption exponent e2 = 519424709. Eve intercepts the two encrypted messages
c1=1244183534 and c2=732959706.
Assuming that Eve also knows N and the two encryption exponents e1 and e2, ... help Eve recover Bob's plaintext without finding a factorization of N.

Exercises 3.14
Use the Miller–Rabin test on each of the following numbers. ...

(a) n = 1105.

(b) n = 294409.

(c) n = 294439.

(d) n = 118901509.

(e) n = 118901521.

(f) n = 118901527.

(g) n = 118915387.

Exercises 3.21
Use Pollard's p–1 method to factor each of the following numbers.

(a) 1739 (b) 220459 (c) 48356747

Exercises 3.24
For each of the listed values of N, k, and binit, factor N by making a list of values ...

(a) N = 143041, k = 247, binit = 1.

(b) N = 1226987, k = 3, binit = 36.

(c) N = 2510839, k = 21, binit = 90.

Exercises 3.27(c)
The following is a list of 20 randomly chosen numbers between 1 and 1000, sorted from smallest to largest. Which of these numbers are 10-power-smooth? Which of them are 10-smooth?
{84, 141, 171, 208, 224, 318, 325, 366, 378, 390, 420, 440, 504, 530, 707, 726, 758, 765, 792, 817}

Exercises 3.41
Perform the following encryptions and decryptions using the Goldwasser–Micali public key cryptosystem...

(a) Bob's public key is the pair N = 1842338473 and a = 1532411781. Alice encrypts three bits and sends Bob the ciphertext blocks
1794677960, 525734818, and 420526487.
Decrypt Alice's message using the factorization N = pq = 32411*56843.

(c) Bob's public key is N = 781044643 and a = 568980706. Encrypt the three bits 1, 1, 0 using, respectively, the three random values
r =705130839, r = 631364468, r = 67651321.

CHAPTER 4 — Probability Theory and Information Theory

Exercises 4.10
Encrypt each of the following Vigenere plaintexts using the given keyword ...

(a) Keyword: hamlet
Plaintext: To be, or not to be, that is the question.

(b) Keyword: fortune
Plaintext: The treasure is buried under the big W.

Exercises 4.11
Decrypt each of the following Vigenere ciphertexts using the given keyword ...

(a) Keyword: condiment
Ciphertext:
rsghz bmcxt dvfsq hnigq xrnbm
pdnsq smbtr ku

(b) Keyword: rabbithole
Ciphtertext:
khfeq ymsci etcsi gjvpw ffbsq
moapx zcsfx epsox yenpk daicx
cebsm ttptx zooeq laflg kipoc
zswqm taujw ghboh vrjtq hu

Exercises 4.13
s = I am the very model of a modern major general.
t = I have information vegatable, animal, and mineral.

Exercises 4.14
s1 = iwseesetftuonhdptbunnybioeatneghictdnsevi
s2 = qibfhroeqeickxmirbqlflgkrqkejbejpepldfjbk
s3 = iesnnciiheptevaireittuevmhooottrtaaflnatg

Exercises 4.15

(a)
s1 = RCZBWBFHSLPSCPILHBGZJTGBIBJGLYIJIBFHCQQFZBYFP
s2 = KHQWGIZMGKPOYRKHUITDUXLXCWZOTWPAHFOHMGFEVUEJJ

(b)
s1 = NTDCFVDHCTHKGUNGKEPGXKEWNECKEGWEWETWKUEVHDKKCDGCWXKDEEAMNHGNDIWUVWSSCTUNIGDSWKE
s2 = IGWSKGEHEXNGECKVWNKVWNKSUTEHTWHEKDNCDXWSIEKDAECKFGNDCPUCKDNCUVWEMGEKWGEUTDGTWHD

Exercises 4.16 (Figure 4.4)
nhqrk vvvfe fwgjo mzjgc kocgk lejrj wossy wgvkk hnesg kwebi
bkkcj vqazx wnvll zetjc zwgqz zwhah kwdxj fgnyw gdfgh bitig
mrkwn nsuhy iecru ljjvs qlvvw zzxyv woenx ujgyr kqbfj lvjzx
dxjfg nywus rwoar xhvvx ssmja vkrwt uhktm malcz ygrsz xwnvl
lzavs hyigh rvwpn ljazl nispv jahym ntewj jvrzg qvzcr estul
fkwis tfylk ysnir rddpb svsux zjgqk xouhs zzrjj kyiwc zckov
qyhdv rhhny wqhyi rjdqm iwutf nkzgd vvibg oenwb kolca mskle
cuwwz rgusl zgfhy etfre ijjvy ghfau wvwtn xlljv vywyj apgzw
trggr dxfgs ceyts tiiih vjjvt tcxfj hciiv voaro lrxij vjnok
mvrgw kmirt twfer oimsb qgrgc

Exercises 4.17 (Figure 4.5)
togmg gbymk kcqiv dmlxk kbyif vcuek cuuis vvxqs pwwej koqgg
phumt whlsf yovww knhhm rcqfq vvhkw psued ugrsf ctwij khvfa
thkef fwptj ggviv cgdra pgwvm osqxg hkdvt whuev kcwyj psgsn
gfwsl jsfse ooqhw tofsh aciin gfbif gabgj adwsy topml ecqzw
asgvs fwrqs fsfvq rhdrs nmvmk cbhrv kblxk gzi

Exercises 4.18 (Figure 4.6)
mgodt beida psgls akowu hxukc iawlr csoyh prtrt udrqh cengx
uuqtu habxw dgkie ktsnp sekld zlvnh wefss glzrn peaoy lbyig
uaafv eqgjo ewabz saawl rzjpv feyky gylwu btlyd kroec bpfvt
psgki puxfb uxfuq cvymy okagl sactt uwlrx psgiy ytpsf rjfuw
igxhr oyazd rakce dxeyr pdobr buehr uwcue ekfic zehrq ijezr
xsyor tcylf egcy

Exercises 4.19

(a) Encrypt the following message using the autokey cipher:
Keyword: LEAR
Plaintext: Come not between the dragon and his wrath.

(b) Decrypt the following message using the autokey cipher:
Keyword: CORDELIA
Ciphertext: pckkm yowvz ejwzk knyzv vurux cstri tgac

(c) Eve intercepts an autokey ciphertext and manages to steal the accompanying plaintext:
Plaintext: ifmusicbethefoodofloveplayon
Ciphertext: azdzwqvjjfbwnqphhmptjsszfjci
Help Eve to figure out the keyword that was used for encryption.

CHAPTER 5 — Elliptic Curves and Cryptography

Exercises 5.11
Convert the proof of Proposition 5.18 into an algorithm...
(a) 349. (b) 9337. (c) 38728. (d) 8379483273489.

Exercises 5.18
Use the Elliptic Curve Factorization Algorithm to factor each of the numbers N using the given elliptic curve E and point P.

(a) N = 589, E : Y2 = X3 + 4X + 9, P = (2,5).

(b) N = 26167, E : Y2 = X3 + 4X + 128, P = (2,12).

(c) N = 1386493, E : Y2 = X3 + 3X – 3, P = (1,1).

(d) N = 28102844557, E : Y2 = X3 + 18X – 453, P = (7,4).

Exercises 5.24
Implement the algorithm in Exercise 523 and...

(a) n = 931, (b) n = 32755, (c) n = 82793729188.

CHAPTER 6 — Lattices and Cryptography

Exercises 6.1
Alice uses the congruential cryptosystem with q = 918293817 and private key (f,g) = (19928,18643).

(b) Alice receives the ciphertext e = 619168806 from Bob. What is the plaintext?

(c) Bob sends Alice a second message by encrypting the plaintext m = 10220 using the ephemeral key r = 19564. What is the ciphertext that Bob sends to Alice?

Exercises 6.2
Use the algorithm described in Proposition 6.5 to "solve" each of the following subset-sum problems. If the "solution" that you get is not correct, explain what went wrong.

(a) M = (3, 7, 19, 43, 89, 195), S = 260.

(b) M = (5, 11, 25, 61, 125, 261), S = 408.

(c) M = (2, 5, 12, 28, 60, 131, 257), S = 334.

(d) M = (4, 12, 15, 36, 75, 162), S = 214.

Exercises 6.3
Alice's public key for a knapsack cryptosystem is
M = (5186, 2779, 5955, 2307, 6599, 6771, 6296, 7306, 4115, 7039).
Eve intercepts the encrypted message S = 26560. She also breaks into Alice's computer and steals Alice's secret multiplier A = 4392, and secret modulus B = 8387. Use this information to find Alice's superincreasing private sequence r and then decrypt the message.

Exercises 6.18
Alice uses the GGH cryptosystem with private basis
v1 = (4, 13) and v2 = (-57, -45)
and public basis
w1 = (25453, 9091) and w2 = (-16096, -5749).

(b) Bob sends Alice the encrypted message e = (155340, 55483). Use Alice's private basis to decrypt the message and recover the plaintext. Also determine Bob's random perturbation r.

Exercises 6.19
Alice uses the GGH cryptosystem with private basis
v1 = (58, 53, -68), v2 = (-110, -112, 35), v3 = (-10, -119, 123).
and public basis
w1 = (324850, -1625176, 2734951), w2 = (165782, -829409, 1395775), w3 = (485054, -2426708, 4083804).

(b) Bob sends Alice the encrypted message e = (8930810, -44681748, 75192665). Use Alice's private basis to decrypt the message and recover the plaintext. Also determine Bob's random perturbation r.

Exercises 6.40
Let L be the lattice generated by the rows of the matrix
20 51 35 59 73 73
14 48 33 61 47 83
95 41 48 84 30 45
0 42 74 79 20 21
6 41 49 11 70 67
23 36 6 1 46 4

Exercises 6.44
Babai's Closest Plane Algorithm, is an alternative rounding method that uses a given basis to solve apprCVP.

(a) L is the lattice generated by the rows of the matrix
-5 16 25 25 13 8
26 -3 -11 14 5 -26
15 -28 16 -7 -21 -4
32 -3 7 -30 -6 26
15 -32 -17 32 -3 11
5 24 0 -13 -46 15

and the target vector is t = (-178, 117, -407, 419, -4, 252).

(b) L is the lattice generated by the rows of the matrix
-33 -15 22 -34 -32 41
10 9 45 10 -6 -3
-32 -17 43 37 29 -30
26 13 -35 -41 42 -15
-50 32 18 35 48 45
2 -5 -2 -38 38 41

and the target vector is t = (-126, -377, -196, 455, -200, -234).

Exercises 6.45
You have been spying on George for some time and overhear him receive a ciphertext e=83493429501 that has been encrypted using the congruential cryptosystem. You also know that George's public key is h = 24201896593 and the public modulus is q = 148059109201. Use Gaussian lattice reduction to recover George's private key (f,g) and the message m.

Exercises 6.46
Let
M = (81946, 80956, 58407, 51650, 38136, 17032, 39658, 67468, 49203, 9546)
and let S = 168296. Use the LLL algorithm to solve the subset-sum problem for M and S.

Exercises 6.47
Alice and Bob communicate using the GGH cryptosystem. Alice's public key is the lattice generated by the rows of the matrix
10305608 -597165 45361210 39600006 12036060
-71672908 4156981 -315467761 -275401230 -83709146
-46304904 2685749 -203811282 -177925680 -54081387
-68449642 3969419 -301282167 -263017213 -79944525
-46169690 2677840 -203215644 -177405867 -53923216
Bob sends her the encypted message
e = (388120266, -22516188, 1708295783, 1491331246, 453299858).
Use LLL to find a reduced basis for Alice's lattice and then use Babai's algorithm to decrypt Bob's message.

CHAPTER 7 — Digital Signatures

Exercises 7.1
Samantha uses the RSA signature scheme with primes p = 541 and q = 1223 and public verification exponent v = 159853.

(a) What is Samantha's public modulus? What is her private signing key?

(b) Samantha signs the digital document D = 630579. What is the signature?

Exercises 7.2
Samantha uses the RSA signature scheme with public modulus N = 1562501 and public verification exponent v = 87953. Adam claims that Samantha has signed each of the documents
D = 119812, D' = 161153, D'' = 586036,
and that the associated signatures are
S = 876453, S' = 870099, S'' = 602754.
Which of these are valid signatures?

Exercises 7.3
Samantha uses the RSA signature scheme with public modulus and public verification exponent
N = 27212325191 and v = 22824469379.
Use whatever method you want to factor N, and then forge Samantha's signature on the document D = 12910258780.

Exercises 7.7
Suppose that Samantha is using the ElGamal signature scheme and that she is careless and uses the same ephemeral key e to sign two documents D and D'.

(c) Apply your method from (b) to the following example and recover Samantha's signing key s, where Samantha is using the prime p = 348149, base g = 113459, and verfication key v = 185149.
D = 153405, S1 = 208913, S2 = 209176,
D' = 127561, S1' = 208913, S2' = 217800.

Exercises 7.13
Samantha uses the GGH digital signature scheme with private and public bases
v1 = (-20,-8,1), w1 = (-248100,220074,332172),
v2 = (14,11,23), w2 = (-112192,99518,150209),
v3 = (-18,1,-12), w3 = (-216150,191737,289401).
What is her signature on the document
d = (834928, 123894, 7812738)?

Exercises 7.14
Samantha uses the GGH digital signature scheme with public basis
w1 = (3712318934,-14591032252,11433651072),
w2 = (-1586446650,6235427140,-4886131219),
w3 = (305711854,-1201580900,941568527).
She publishes the signature
(6987814629, 14496863295, -9625064603)
on the document
d = (5269775, 7294466, 1875937).
If the maximum allowed distance from the signature to the document is 60, verify that Samantha's signature is valid.

Exercises 7.15
Samantha uses the GGH digital signature scheme with public basis
w1 = (-1612927239,1853012542,1451467045),
w2 = (-2137446623,2455606985,1923480029),
w3 = (2762180674,-3173333120,-2485675809).
Use LLL or some other lattice reduction algorithm to find a good basis for Samantha's lattice, and then use the good basis to help Eve forge a signature on the document
d = (87398273893, 763829184, 118237397273).
What is the distance from your forged signature lattice vector to the target vector? (You should be able to get a distance smaller than 100.)

Exercises 7.16
Samantha uses an NTRU digital signature with (N,q,d) = (11,23,3).

(a) Samantha's private key is
f = (1, -1, 1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 1, 0, -1, 0),
g = (0, -1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, -1, 1, -1),
F = (0, -1, -1, 1, -3, -1, 0, -3, -3, -2, 2),
G = (-3, -1, 2, 4, 3, -4, -1, 3, 5, 5, -1).
She uses her private key to sign the digital document D=(D1,D2) given by
D1 = (0, 8, -6, -6, -5, -1, 9, -2, -6, -4, -6),
D2 = (9, 9, -10, 2, -3, 2, 6, 6, 5, 0, 8).
Compute the signature s.

(b) Samantha's public verification key is
h = (5, 8, -5, -11, 8, 8, 8, 5, 3, -10, 5).
Compute the other part of the signature th * s (mod q) and find the distance between the lattice vector (s,t) and the target vector D.

(c) Suppose that Eve attempts to sign D using Samantha's public vectors (1,h) and (0,q). What signature (s',t') does she get and how far is it from the target vector D?

Exercises 7.17
Samantha uses an NTRU digital signature with (N,q,d) = (11,23,3).

(a) She creates a private key using the ternary vectors
f = (1, 1, 1, 1, 0, -1, -1, 0, 0, 0, -1),
g = (-1, 0, 1, 1, -1, 0, 0, 1, -1, 0, 1).
Use the algorithm described in Table 7.6 to find short vectors F and G satsifying f * G-g * F = q.

(b) Samantha uses the private signing key (f,g,F,G) to sign the digital document D=(D1,D2) given by
D1 = (5, 5, -5, -10, 3, -7, -3, 2, 0, -5, -11),
D2 = (8, 9, -10, -7, 6, -3, 1, 4, 4, 4, -7).
What the signature s?

(c) What is Samantha's public verification key h?

(d) Compute th * s (mod q) and determine the distance from the lattice vector (s,t) to the target vector D.


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